Does the anglican church believe in transubstantiation


What is Transubstantiation?

In the Anglican Church, transubstantiation is not an article of faith, and there is no official doctrine on the subject. However, many Anglicans believe in transubstantiation, and the belief is widely accepted within the church.

What is the Anglican Church’s official stance on Transubstantiation?

The Anglican Church does not have an official stance on transubstantiation. This doctrine is not essential to Anglican beliefs, and therefore there is no official position on it. However, many Anglicans do believe in transubstantiation, and the doctrine is taught in some Anglican churches.

The Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion


The Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion (often abbreviated as the 39 Articles) are a list of affirmations and denials contained in the English Book of Common Prayer. Thesearticles have served as standards of Anglican belief and practice since the 16th century.

The articles were first published in 1563 by Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury. He intended them to serve as a statement of faith for the newly formed Church of England. The articles were based on the teachings of several earlier theologians, including John Wycliffe, Martin Luther, and Huldrych Zwingli.

In 1801, the Church of England revised the 39 Articles to include additional affirming statements about transubstantiation and other Catholic beliefs and practices. However, these revisions were never fully accepted by all Anglicans and were later abandoned.

Today, the original 39 Articles are still used by some Anglican churches, including those in the United States.

The Book of Common Prayer

The Book of Common Prayer (BCP) is the Anglican Church’s official stance on Transubstantiation. The BCP is the only authoritative source for Anglican doctrine and practice. In it, the Church of England affirms the Catholic doctrine of Transubstantiation, which teaches that the bread and wine used in Holy Communion are changed into the body and blood of Christ. This change is said to occur “in, with, and under” the bread and wine, which remain as they were before.

What do Anglican theologians believe about Transubstantiation?

Anglican theologians have typically taken a more moderate position on the doctrine of transubstantiation, affirming that the bread and wine do indeed become the body and blood of Christ, but without specifying exactly how this transformation takes place. This is sometimes referred to as the “real presence” of Christ in the Eucharist.

How does the Anglican Church practice Transubstantiation?

The Anglican Church does not have an official doctrine on transubstantiation, but many Anglicans believe in it. The majority of Anglicans believe that Christ is present in the bread and wine of the Eucharist, but they do not believe that the bread and wine actually become his body and blood. Instead, they believe that Christ is spiritually present in the bread and wine.

Conclusion

Based on the information above, it appears that the Anglican Church does not officially believe in transubstantiation. However, there is some evidence to suggest that some members of the church do believe in this doctrine.


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